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A water rocket is a type of model rocket using water as its reaction mass. The pressure vessel (the engine of the rocket) is constructed from thin plastic or other non metallic materials (usually a used plastic soft drink bottle) weighing 1,500 grams or less. The water is forced out by compressed air. It is an example of Newton's third law of motion.

Anti-gravity 430 psi compressor

Discussion about Compressors, hose, pipes, fittings, launchers, release mechanisms, and launch tubes.
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RaZias
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Anti-gravity 430 psi compressor

Post by RaZias » Tue May 18, 2010 10:26 am

Does anyone knows the air compressor that anti-gravity destroyed at 430 psi ?

See at 0:50 on the following video:

[youtube][/youtube]


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Tim Chen
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Re: Anti-gravity 430 psi compressor

Post by Tim Chen » Tue May 18, 2010 12:19 pm

Wow. That's pretty impressive. I don't know which compressor that was but I bet it could go up to 300PSI all day long without failing. Why don't you email them and invite them to the forum so we can ask them questions and ask them what the compressor they used was!


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RaZias
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Re: Anti-gravity 430 psi compressor

Post by RaZias » Wed May 19, 2010 4:47 am

Here is the e-mail answear from Anti-gravity:

I bought the compressor from Sears. It was a Craftsman 2 horsepower tankless type, which they don't make anymore, but you can use just about any small, portable compressor if you remove the tank.
I achieved the high pressures by closing up the air intake and connecting it to my big shop compressor at 100 psi.
In this way, the Sears unit acted as the second stage in a two stage compressor. It failed at 430 psi because the piston's connecting rod bent.

When experimenting with higher pressures, make sure to remove the tank (or it will explode!) Also, expect the compressor to fail.

I use a nitrogen tank system nowadays for high powered experiments. It is an automated fill/launch system (with parts of a Sears Craftsman 19.2V handheld compressor as the controller) that allows
me to drive 700 feet away in time to film the flights.

Best regards,

Ken Schellenberg
AntiGravity Research Corporation
sales@antigravityresearch.com


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