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A water rocket is a type of model rocket using water as its reaction mass. The pressure vessel (the engine of the rocket) is constructed from thin plastic or other non metallic materials (usually a used plastic soft drink bottle) weighing 1,500 grams or less. The water is forced out by compressed air. It is an example of Newton's third law of motion.

USWR 3d printed nozzle problems

Discussion about Compressors, hose, pipes, fittings, launchers, release mechanisms, and launch tubes.
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Noodleman
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USWR 3d printed nozzle problems

Post by Noodleman » Sat Apr 22, 2017 2:21 am

Hello, i have 3d printed a USWR gardena quick connect nozzle, but when i try to fit it in to my quick connector, the O-ring i took from the original gardena quick connect nozzle is too big to fit on the 3d printed nozzle and sticks out too much. So, i tried sanding the o-ring, but now, you have to push the nozzle in to the quick connect INCREDIBLY HARD to get a proper hold,while it still leaks a little. How do i fix this issue?



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U.S. Water Rockets
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Re: USWR 3d printed nozzle problems

Post by U.S. Water Rockets » Sat Apr 22, 2017 1:25 pm

What you are seeing is likely due to the differences between each brand and model of 3D printer, your filament, and the settings you have configured in your 3D slicer. There's no easy way to know how to pinpoint exactly how to change your settings to make this go away forever, unless you do a lot of trial and error. Your best bet is to just get some sandpaper and fold it over a bit of cardboard or some other skinny flat sheet and use the folded edge to sand out the o-ring groove in the nozzle to make a better fit.

From your description, it appears that the overhangs in the nozzle groove are sagging down as the printer prints and closing the gap a little. This leads to an uneven surface for the o-ring to seal on and makes it a tight fit. Sanding the groove should solve both of these issues.



Noodleman
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Re: USWR 3d printed nozzle problems

Post by Noodleman » Sat Apr 22, 2017 4:42 pm

U.S. Water Rockets wrote:What you are seeing is likely due to the differences between each brand and model of 3D printer, your filament, and the settings you have configured in your 3D slicer. There's no easy way to know how to pinpoint exactly how to change your settings to make this go away forever, unless you do a lot of trial and error. Your best bet is to just get some sandpaper and fold it over a bit of cardboard or some other skinny flat sheet and use the folded edge to sand out the o-ring groove in the nozzle to make a better fit.

From your description, it appears that the overhangs in the nozzle groove are sagging down as the printer prints and closing the gap a little. This leads to an uneven surface for the o-ring to seal on and makes it a tight fit. Sanding the groove should solve both of these issues.
Thank you, i will try this with my nozzle.



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