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A water rocket is a type of model rocket using water as its reaction mass. The pressure vessel (the engine of the rocket) is constructed from thin plastic or other non metallic materials (usually a used plastic soft drink bottle) weighing 1,500 grams or less. The water is forced out by compressed air. It is an example of Newton's third law of motion.

air compressors explosions

Discussion about Compressors, hose, pipes, fittings, launchers, release mechanisms, and launch tubes.
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RaZias
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air compressors explosions

Post by RaZias » Mon Aug 31, 2009 4:43 pm

http://www2.worksafebc.com/Portals/Cons ... centre.org

Compressor explodes, demolishing concrete block wall

An air compressor exploded, destroying a room and blowing a hole in a concrete block wall. As a result, BC Safety Authority has issued a safety order under the Safety Standards Act to owners of compressed air systems and air receivers.
Safety Order (PDF 614 KB)
Source: BC Safety Authority


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Re: air compressors explosions

Post by RaZias » Mon Aug 31, 2009 4:45 pm

http://ncsp.tamu.edu/reports/WorkCover/Alerts.htm

Air receiver on a compressor explodes

This Alert highlights the need to maintain compressor equipment to prevent explosive rupture of the air receiver tank.

Recently an air receiver of a compact air compressor unit exploded in a panel-beating workshop, narrowly missing an employee and causing material damage.

Compressors of this type are commonly used in smaller businesses, like automotive repairers, for spray painting, vehicle hoisting and other applications.

Although there was corrosion on the inside surface of the cylinder, the explosion was probably due to poor maintenance of the air supply line.


How can an air receiver tank explode?
During operation, deposits of lubricating oil tend to build up in the line supplying compressed air from the compressor cylinder to the air receiver. As the diameter of the supply line decreases, the already high temperature of the compressed air rises further to a point where it is possible for the contaminant to ignite.

Sparks are then carried into the air receiver where oil from the compressor, which is often present as a mixture with air in the air receiver, burns explosively. As the pressure relief valve is not designed for such an event, rupture of the air receiver vessel is likely to occur. In other air compressor accidents, static electricity sparks have also been identified as a source of fires and explosions.


Prevention measures
To avoid such incidents and damage, all air compressor equipment should be maintained in a safe operational condition and be regularly inspected. To prevent excessive fouling of compressed air supply lines, only the grade of oil recommended by the manufacturer/supplier should be used in the compressor.

Maintenance
A good maintenance program for compressor equipment should include checking the condition and operation of the following parts:

* compressor pump and motor:
o Pump and other seals
o Exhaust valve
o Belt guard (if applicable)
o Drive belt
o Oil separator/filter, and
o Discharge pipe

* receiver:
o Physical internal condition. This may require a general clean out and a hydraulic test (as specified in Australian Standard AS/NZS 3788 – 2001: Pressure equipment – In-service inspection ) or Magnetic Particle Testing if applicable
o Checking and maintenance of relief and drain valves and pressure gauges
* electrics (to be performed by an electrician or person competent in electrical testing):
o Earth connection and adequacy of insulation
o Contacts in the pressure switch
o Electronic controller, if applicable. Newer compressors are fitted with electronic controllers that include pressure switches in them

Note: The above list is by no means exhaustive and may need to include other items according to the particular type, brand and model of the compressor unit.

Inspection
AS/NZS 3788 should be used for guidance on conducting an inspection of air-receivers. In general, the extent of the inspection and how often inspections should occur should be sufficient to assure proper functioning of the pressure equipment. A good inspection program will include:

* Using supportive testing and examination methods; e.g. owners of air compressors should follow maintenance and testing recommendations of the manufacturer or supplier of the compressor and ancillary equipment
* Keeping maintenance and inspection records of all registered plant
* Making use of experience gained personally and from other sources


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Re: air compressors explosions

Post by RaZias » Mon Aug 31, 2009 4:47 pm

http://yellowsocks.com/v4/node/14

A compressor for car tires has exploded.

Contents under pressure
Posted September 11th, 2008 by John

* Babble
* Life


There is really nothing that gives you an appreciation for life, than to almost loose yours.

My car had a soft tire that I needed to fill up. My normal routine when adding air to a tire, is plugging in my air compressor so it starts filling the tank, then proceed to check and fill the tire. When the tire is full, I usually walk back to the compressor unplug it and hang up the hose. On this day, I happen to check all the tires. As I was walking back towards the air compressor, I thought “geez, that thing is still running…Normally it would have shut off by now.”

Listening to my spidey sense, I decided to wait until the compressor shut off before walking up to it. And it’s a good thing I did, because it never shut off… It exploded.

To me, the air compressor made a popping sound…In actuality, my wife and kids heard a loud explosion from inside the house. (This also knocked a large picture off the wall.)

Since everything happened so fast, I didn’t actually “see” anything happen. When Michelle ran out into the garage, there was still insulation raining on everything. Luckily, I was there to tell her everything was fine. The compressor, found a final resting place on the hood of my Trailblazer. Before resting on my truck, it moved the garage wall about a foot, knocked off the truck mirror, and slide down the hood resting against the garage door. (Right about where I would have been standing)

I was still a little bit in shock, but I did take a few pictures. (not very good ones, but at least I took them)

So how did this thing explode? Good question. Obviously the auto-shutoff did not work AND the safety release did not work either. Examining the wreckage, there was no visible weak points, and the metal did not seem fatigued. The compressor, a 14 gallon model made by Sanborn Mfg is no longer supported by the company that took over for the now bankrupt original company. Gee, I wonder why they are out of business; I guess exploding air compressors are not good for business. I’m just glad I am here to write this post.


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Re: air compressors explosions

Post by RaZias » Mon Aug 31, 2009 4:53 pm

http://www.nytimes.com/1988/04/27/nyreg ... -site.html


4 Hurt in Air Compressor Explosion at Manhattan Construction Site
By MARK A. UHLIG
Published: Wednesday, April 27, 1988

Three pedestrians and a construction worker were injured yesterday when an air compressor hose exploded at a construction site on the Avenue of the Americas, hurling debris into the street and starting a small fire.

New York City officials said the accident was the second one involving such a compressor in less than a month, and they ordered an immediate inspection of all similar machines in use throughout the city. The trailer-like compressors, which power pneumatic tools through a network of air hoses, are typically parked at curbside near city construction sites, placing them close to sidewalk crowds.

''The machinery is a type commonly used during excavation and other foundation work,'' said the city's Commissioner of Buildings, Charles M. Smith Jr. ''Starting tomorrow, we're going to inventory all of the construction sites in the foundation and excavation stage where this kind of heavy compressor would be used, and ask the construction company or their lessors to inspect the equipment.''

The inspections were not expected to delay any construction projects. 'Blown to Pieces'

The accident yesterday occurred at about 1:15 P.M. at the site of the planned Americas Tower, a 50-story structure being built by Turner-KM Construction Company at 1177 Avenue of the Americas, near 45th Street.

Mr. Smith said a hose carrying air from the compressor burst about 10 feet from the diesel-powered compressor.

''The rupture of the hose sent out a concussion wave that spread to the other side of the street, knocking down pedestrians,'' Mr. Smith said. ''The hose itself was blown to pieces, and one of the fragments struck a pedestrian.''

A police spokesman, Detective Vincent Jones, said the explosion had ignited some nearby diesel fuel, causing a fire.

Although city investigators had not yet completed an examination of the machine, Mr. Smith said the rupture had apparently resulted from a sudden increase in pressure or a flaw in the hose, which was made of a hard composition rubber lining reinforced by wire strands and covered by a fiber shell.

City investigators found no safety violations in the operation of the machine, and no summonses were issued, Mr. Smith said.

Detective Jones identified the passers-by injured in the accident as Yvonne Acevedo, 27 years old, of the Bronx, who was listed in stable condition at Roosevelt Hospital suffering from a loss of hearing in her left ear; Marie Dudra, 68, who was admitted to Bellevue Hospital Center with lacerations, and Joan Sireci, 60, of Queens, who refused medical treatment. The police had no further information on Ms. Sireci's injuries. Madison Square Garden Site

Jerome Gasp, a 58-year-old Manhattan construction worker, was treated at New York Hospital for burns to his right shoulder and face, Detective Jones said.

Mr. Smith said the other recent compressor accident had occurred at a construction site at 350 West 50th Street, on the block of the former Madison Square Garden, where a pipe fitting on a compressor hose failed under pressure. A fragment of the fitting or hose was hurled across the street and broke a shop window, but no injuries were reported.

In both accidents, the compressors involved were manufactured by the Ingersoll-Rand Company, he said. Other than the two recent accidents, Mr. Smith said he could recall no problems involving similar air compressors. The machine involved in the accident yesterday was virtually new, authorities said, and had been in use for 400 hours.

Photo of firemen examining compressor which exploded and started fire (NYT/Suzanne DeChillo)


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Re: air compressors explosions

Post by RaZias » Mon Aug 31, 2009 4:55 pm

http://www.dnv.com/industry/maritime/pu ... oflife.asp

Fatal Air compressor accident at 30 bars

Extent of damage
In addition to damage to the compressor, one of the parts from the compressor hit the attending engineer with fatal consequences.

Probable cause
The most probable cause of the casualty was overpressure due to malfunction of the safety valve for the high-pressure stage of the compressor. The air compressor is a single cylinder, two stage single acting and water-cooled, with a working pressure of 30 bar. The investigation found that the air outlet valve from the compressor was in the closed position. The safety valve for the high-pressure side of the compressor was tested shortly after the incident and found to open at about 50-60 bar. It was not known if or when the compressor's safety valves had last been tested.

Lessons to be learned
Prior to putting the compressor into service after maintenance work has been carried out, it is of great importance that associated systems are correctly lined up.
The safety valves of the air compressor are to be periodically function tested according to the manufacturer's instructions. Such tests should be included in ships' maintenance systems.
Prior to starting, overhauled machinery and line up of associated systems should be checked by a senior engine officer.


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